EXPOSURE SHOWS

NEW FOR 2018!

REPLICA U.S. NAVY DESTROYER


    Recreational boats have been a consistent feature at the Exposure outdoor and recreation shows through the years. Now looking ahead to the 2018 shows, they’ll be joined by a big brother, a ship.

     It will actually be a replica of a World War II U.S. Navy destroyer. The 16-foot ship, named the U.S.S. Norton, will be on display at the Exposure shows to honor and recognize military veterans and those on active duty.

     “If there are veterans involved, we try to get it there,” said Bud Bessey of the replica ship. “We’ve had it in several different parades and at several different events.”

     Bessey, a U.S. Navy veteran and a Myrtle Creek resident, and a handful of his retired Navy friends built the ship in 2013. He said the local chapter of the Fleet Reserve Association, of which he is a member, needed something to represent it and its members in parades and at events.

     In 2016, prior to the annual Veterans Day Parade in Roseburg, the replica destroyer was christened the U.S.S. Norton by two-star U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Nancy Norton, a 1982 Roseburg High School graduate.

     “Everybody is in love with it,” Bessey said of the response the destroyer receives when it is displayed.

     Bessey said the ship is “built to scale, for the most part.”

     “We’re glad to have it at the shows or wherever veterans are involved,” he said.  

     Bessey joined the Navy at age 17. He worked as a welder, working on ships ranging from salvage tugs to oil tankers. In 1967, he was deployed to Vietnam where he worked on a repair ship that serviced the Mobile Riverine Force.

     After three years in Vietnam, Bessey became a Navy recruiter, then a career counselor for sailors and eventually took a job with the Traveling Vietnam Wall, a memorial to those who served during the Vietnam War.

     Bessey is an accredited veterans service officer with Veterans Affairs. He said he and the U.S.S. Norton are always proud to represent the U.S. Navy and its veterans and sailors at different events.

FISHIN' TRIPS CHARTERS

     

     Finally, after years of dreaming about being a fishing guide on the ocean, Clarence Cole, Jr., is doing so.

     The 54-year-old established Fishin’ Trips Charters in 2017. In his 2015 26-foot Hewescraft Pacific Explorer, Cole took clients on fishing trips out of Brookings and Coos Bay along the southern Oregon coast, pursuing salmon, tuna and bottom fish.

     “I’ve been dreaming about this forever,” Cole said. “I love to fish. That’s what I do, I fish.

     “With my wife’s blessing and several friends pushing me, I’m now guiding,” he explained.

     Cole will be available to talk about fishing and his own fishing experiences at three 2018 Exposure shows. He’ll have a booth at the KEZI Eugene Boat & Sportsmen’s Show in Eugene from Feb. 2 to 4, at the ServPro Sportsmen’s & Outdoor Recreation Show in Roseburg from Feb. 16 to 18 and at the Newswatch 12 Sportsmen’s & Outdoor Recreation in Central Point from Feb. 23 to 25.

     Cole had many fishing experiences in his younger years, working as a teenaged deckhand when his father, an Air Force veteran, ran charter fishing trips out of Pacific City and out of Charleston for active military members and for retired veterans. Then after graduating from Mazama High School in Klamath Falls in 1981, Cole joined the Coast Guard and he was able to fish when stationed at Ketchikan, Alaska, Winchester Bay and Coos Bay. He’s also been able to fish along the Gulf Coast and in several Canadian lakes.

     But after his four years in the Coast Guard, he worked fulltime for Jeld-Wen and Pacific Power, putting his dream of a guiding business on hold for a few decades. He still fished on weekends, but didn’t go fulltime as a fishing guide until deciding early in 2017 to quit his job with Pacific Power in order to pursue his dream job .

     “I love what I do,” he said of fishing. “I’m one of the luckiest guys walking.”

     Cole fishes out of Brookings from March through June and then moves north and fishes out of Charleston during July, August and September. He wraps up the fishing season back in Brookings, fishing out of that port during October.

     “It’s all weather dependent,” he said.

     Cole said he most enjoys fishing for tuna.

     “I’ve done a lot of different things in my life, but probably the most exciting fishing I’ve done is catching tuna,” he said. “There’s nothing like it. Even a 15-pound tuna, when it turns to run, it’s all you can do to hold on. When you catch a 35-pounder, it takes everything you have to hold on. Tuna pull harder than any salmon.

     “To be trolling along and running six fishing rods and then to have all six screaming, that kind of excitement is awesome,” Cole said.

     During the 2017 fishing season, Cole said the average tuna trip was 30 to 35 miles offshore. He said salmon trips out of Brookings were 6 to 12 miles offshore and the bottom fishing trips were just a half to one mile out.

     Cole said he enjoys teaching people how to fish and he likes to take first-time anglers out.

      "Those are my most fun trips,” he said. “To see somebody catch their first fish, that’ll get them hooked on fishing and that’ll keep fishing alive. You also make a friend for life.”

     Cole was able to take two people in wheelchairs fishing this past year.

     “Those were cool days,” he said. “To have those people on my boat, to share the love of the sport of fishing with them, to share with people who are ready to give up because of their disability, to see a smile on their face, those are wonderful days of fishing.”

     Cole encourages those who fish with him to get involved in all aspects of the fishing experience, from baiting the hooks to landing the fish. He wants visitors to feel like they are part of the crew.

     Cole can be contacted by calling 541-891-2309 or by email at FishinTrips@msn.com. More information on Cole’s fishing guide business can be found online at FishinTripsCharters.com.

BEAR CREEK HUNTING ADVENTURES

     

     Tim O’Hagan and Drew Bakken have been outdoorsmen and hunters si nce they were old enough to walk in the woods and to carry a rifle.

     For close to 20 years now they’ve been sharing their love for the outdoors through Bear Creek Hunting Adventures. They operate their business out of Denver, Colorado, but they offer their guided and unguided hunts on a leased private ranch that is located on the state’s central western slopes of the Rocky Mountains.

     Hunt opportunities include elk, mule deer, bear, moose, mountain lion, turkey and grouse. The elk, deer and bear seasons all coincide during the respective fall archery, black powder and rifle hunting seasons.

     Bakken will share his knowledge of those hunts when he represents Bear Creek Hunting Adventures at the KEZI Eugene Boat & Sportsmen’s Show in Eugene from Feb. 2-4.

     “We just have a passion for the outdoors, a love for what we’re doing, a love for meeting people,” said Bakken who is a third generation Colorado native.

     “This area has one of the healthiest elk herds in the state, according to the Colorado Division of Wildlife,” he added.

     Bakken described the terrain of the ranch as moderate. Hunters have the option of using a tree stand, a ground blind or spotting and stalking.

  

OFFICIAL SHOW ARTIST JEANNE WARREN

     

     Jeanne Warren is carrying on the hunting and fishing traditions of her family.

     But she is able to hunt and fish on a year-round basis because she is an outdoors and wildlife oil painting artist. There are no seasonal limits to her profession.

     During the upcoming 2018 outdoors show season Warren will be the official wildlife artist for the Exposure shows and will have her artwork prominently displayed at each of the four shows. She said she’ll have 50 or more pieces of art at each show. In addition to original artwork, she’ll have limited edition prints and greeting cards that feature her work. Warren also does commissioned artwork.

     The shows are the KEZI Eugene Boat & Sportsmen’s Show Feb. 2-4 in Eugene, Oregon; ServPro Sportsmen’s & Outdoor Recreation Show Feb. 16-18 in Roseburg, Oregon; Newswatch 12 Sportsmen’s & Outdoor Recreation Show Feb. 23-25 in Medford, Oregon; and Crown Motors NorCal Boat, Sport & RV Show March 2-4 in Anderson, California.

     Warren, who is self taught and has a studio in Grants Pass, paints from her own experiences. She is a life-long hiker and outdoors enthusiast who has taken thousands of photographs during those ventures.

     She has visited many wild places in the Pacific Northwest and has made several fishing trips to Alaska. She has been able to photograph deer and elk in the wild and has had close encounters with bears in Glacier National Park in Montana and on her Alaska trips. She uses her photographs for reference while painting.

     Many of her finished pictures include details from several photos.

“I paint from experiences I have had,” she explained. “I paint from the inspiration I get from the experiences I have had. Hiking, that’s a passion I have and I need that fix. Then I come home and paint.

     “People always have a passion for something and sometimes they are able to follow their dreams,” she added. “I’ve been able to. I’ve always known I could do this. It draws me, like a bee to honey.”

     Warren grew up in the forested outdoors of the Coast Range east of Newport. Members of her large family were both hunters and fishermen.

Her mother, Norma Warren, also enjoyed painting, but did it only recreationally. Jeanne Warren said her mother was a talented artist and was an inspiration to her. Jeanne was encouraged to paint by her parents, Ted and Norma.

     While Jeanne painted and sold some artwork prior to 1994, that was a key year for her. Her painting of a coho salmon earned first-place honors in the 1994 Association of Northwest Steelheaders annual art print/stamp contest, her first national competition.

That award gave her the confidence that she could turn her artwork into a fulltime profession and livelihood.

     She also finished first in the 1995 Washington State Wild Trout print/stamp contest. She placed third in the 1994 Oregon State Wild Trout print/stamp contest and won the 1996 People’s Choice Award for the Canby Wine and Art Festival. She was a top 10 finalist in the 1995 Minnesota Deer Hunters Association print contest and her art has finished in the top 20 in some Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation contests.

     In 1996, she completed two official Keiko/Free Willy Commemorative prints that she donated to the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport to help raise funds for the whale.

     “It is important to place in these contests because it gives me and my art recognition and marketing,” Warren said. “That helps me with my goal of building my business and getting my artwork shown in bigger shows.”

     In addition to painting with oils, Warren cuts the matting and frames for her pictures. She also teaches oil and acrylic painting classes at her Grants Pass studio.

     “I find a lot of happiness and solace in doing this,” Warren said of landscape and wildlife painting. “It is therapeutic for me.”

     To include her faith in her artwork, Warren paints a tiny cross in each of her works. She explained the crosses “keep me humble.” People have fun looking for them, but they are hard to find, whether in an animal’s eye or in the bark of a tree.

     At the upcoming ExpoSure shows, Warren will be painting at her booth. But she doesn’t mind stopping and talking about her wild artwork with visitors to the show.

   The hunters who pursued elk during the September 2017 archery season were very successful, according to Bakken. The four-week rifle season is from mid-October to mid-November.

     Bear Creek Hunting Adventures offers a main lodge that provides for 10 hunters at a time, and the Cottonwood and Fire Mountain cabins each sleep 6 to 8 people. Meals are included at the lodge. Cooks can be requested for the cabins.

     Vehicles can be driven to any of the three locations and hunters can basically start their hunts right from any of the front doors.

     “You’ll have the opportunity to see animals,” Bakken said. “Then it is up to the hunter to take the shot.”

MORE TO COME!

Check back for more new attractions at the 2018 Shows!